Our Babies

 

Asian Small-Clawed Otter

Our furry little Otters are roaming around eager to make friends with new guests. The Asian small-clawed otter inhabits mangrove swamps and freshwater wetlands native to South and South East Asia. Due to habitat loss , pollution, and hunting it is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Kinkajou

The Kinkajou is a tropical rainforest mammal related to Raccoons, Ringtails and Cacomistle. These beautiful animals are arboreal, meaning they live most of their lives in trees. Although, classified in the order of Carnivora with razor sharp teeth, our Kinkajou’s diet consists mainly of fruit, particularly figs.

Ring-Tailed Lemurs

Our Ring-Tailed Lemurs are the most recognized of all Lemurs due to their long, black and white ringed tail. Like all Lemurs, the Ring-Tailed little ones are native to the island of Madagascar located off the coast of East Africa.

 

Pogona (Bearded Dragon)

The name “bearded dragon” refers to the “beard” of the dragon, the underside of the throat, turning black, often as a result of stress. Pogona species lay on rocks and exposed branches in the mornings and afternoons. They can be found throughout Australia in a wide range of habitats such as deserts, shrublands and Eucalyptus woodlands.

 

Baby Ducks

Ducks are mostly aquatic birds. Generally, smaller than swans and geese, they may be found in both fresh water and sea water. The word duck comes from the Old English “dūce “diver”, a derivative of the verb “dūcan “to duck, or dive”, because of the way many species in the dabbling duck group feed by upending.

 

 

Velociraptor

The Velociraptor, or raptor, is most familiar to the general public due to its prominent role in the Jurassic Park motion picture series. In real life, however, the Velociraptor was roughly the size of a turkey, considerably smaller than the approximately 2 m (7 ft) tall and 80 kg (180 lb) reptiles seen in the films (which were based on members of the related genus Deinonychus). Today, Velociraptor is well known to paleontologists, with over a dozen described fossil skeletons, the most of any dromaeosaurid.

 

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13530 N. Hwy 183 #101
Austin, TX 78750
512-222-5586
info@austinaquarium.com

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